Category

Innovation

Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519)

IoT-Infused Innovation

By | Innovation, PLM | No Comments

The Innovator’s Myopia

Many product organization suffer from acute myopia. Once a product is sold or installed in the field, they lose sight of its performance, how users are interacting with it, and how well it supports the brand.

Of course, organizations do get some feedback from customers and field operations from time to time. But this information usually comes in the form of bad news: customer complaints, excessive warranty claims, and costly product replacements and repairs.

Upon careful observation, we should realize that organizational myopia doesn’t set during product deployment. It usually starts much earlier, when product marketing defines market needs and functional requirements for a new promising product.

Products are frequently defined and designed based on inaccurate, out of date, and biased perceptions about customer needs and competitive landscape. Product organizations are highly optimistic about customers enthusiasm to cope with yet another “disruptive” technology. And product designers often lack sufficient understanding of existing workflows and process integration requirements.

No wonder most new products fail. Read More

At The Optometrist (Norman Rockwell, 1956)

The Connected Enterprise as a Cure for Organizational Myopia

By | Innovation, Internet of Things, PLM | No Comments

Does Your Product Organization Suffer from Myopia?

You may not be aware of it, but your product organization may be suffering from acute myopia. Once the product is sold or installed in the field, product management lose sight of its performance, how users are interacting with it, and how well it meets customer expectations and business portfolio and market targets.

To be sure, your organization probably does hear back from customers from time to time. But when it does happen, it is usually bad news: customer complaints, excessive warranty claims, and costly replacements and repairs. Read More

Another America (Robert Weingarten, 2014)

Technology Evaluation the Amish Way

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I spend a good amount of time reviewing technology and business innovations, and helping companies define, measure and articulate the value of new products and business models. Most of these interactions are exciting and challenging, as many of these new ideas are highly creative and demonstrate a serious attempt to create value for businesses, improve the quality of life of individuals and communities, and protect the environment.

On the other hand, too many of these innovations can be categorized simply as frivolous and wasteful, of the type that grabs headlines at the annual CES gathering but go nowhere and end up at top of the junk heap.

But telling the promising from the pointless, and the useful from the wasteful, isn’t always easy. It is certainly challenging to explain to a young bright-eyed and bushy-tailed entrepreneur why his idea may be “cool” but offers no meaningful value.

An old NPR podcast from 2013 about the Amish community triggered some musings about discovering and establishing the value of technology innovation. Read More

Section perpendiculaire du moulin des Verdiers (Jean-Jacque Lequeu, 1778)

PLM as an Innovation Platform

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The Promise of PLM

A recent discussion titled Dassault Systèmes Bets Big on a Product Innovation Platform argues that the role of a PLM platform is to bundle different data sources and enable smooth data exchange among tools, processes and users. While not incorrect, this view is potentially limiting.

File and data interoperability, single source of (electrical/mechanical/software) truth, hardware/software development synchronization, and similar notions have been the core principles of PLM for quite some time; some, in fact, for a very long time. How well PLM vendors achieve these goals is a topic for a separate conversation. Read More

Narcissus (Carravagio, C. 1597-99)

Innovation and the Inherent Bias of Technology

By | Innovation, Internet of Things, IT Strategy, Manufacturing | No Comments

The Imherent Bias of Technology

“Technology is neither good nor bad; nor is it neutral” declared Melvin Kranzberg.

Indeed, not only is technology un-neutral, it has an intrinsic bias. In the process of defining and implementing software to perform certain tasks and solve particular problems, the designers make many assumptions and decisions—most of which are irreversible—about the intended tasks, workflows, work environment, and user profiles. Unintentionally, the marketers and designers of software tools introduce a bias.

Douglas Allchin maintains that in itself this inherent bias does not pose a problem, but it does dictate how the technology is being used, and who can and cannot use it. Consequently, the innate bias influences the ability of the organization to realize the full value of the technology.

Read More